Spring/Summer, 1982/5742

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In this issue: Questioning roles dictated by custom and not law, Blu Greenberg finds room for feminism in Orthodox Judaism. Aviva Cantor redefines the Passover seder with her egalitarian hagadah, incorporating stories and poetry by and about women. A short story about a mentally disabled girl and the Nazis.

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How an Orthodox Woman Evolved Beyond “Woman of Valor” to Become a Fervent Feminist (Book Excerpt)

by Blu Greenberg

Starting out as a young woman steeped in the Jewish tradition and happy with her prescribed role in the family and community, the author gradually became conscious of various inequities in Jewish practice. Over a period of 20 years, she slowly began to perceive how they fell into a pattern. As she confronted this reality, she was forced to face her own fears and conflicts—-and those of the Orthodox community she is a part of.

An Egalitarian Hagada

by Aviva Cantor

Over the past decade, women have been holding feminist Seders and have drawn strength and inspiration from joining in such ceremonies that focus on and celebrate our experiences. Now the time has come to share these insights with a wider audience, and to make them an integral part of the Passover ceremony. The non-sexist and egalitarian hagada in this special section incorporates stories and poetry by and about women—-as well as other passages and poems translated from Hebrew and Yiddish—-about the Holocaust and Resistance, Israel, Soviet Jewry, and struggles for justice into the traditional narrative of the Seder.

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Gerta

fiction by Maxine Rose Schur

The scene is Berlin under the Nazis. Gerta has two counts against her: she is mentally disabled—and she is Jewish. She is also unprotected...

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