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In this issue: Stephanie Wellen Levine lives with Brooklyn’s Lubavitch Jews for a year to find out what Hasidic girls are really like. Half, whole, holy: 3 memoirs of being half-Jewish, or married to a non-Jew, or not Jewish enough. Anne Frank at 75: writers and readers say how Anne touched their lives. First-time Jewish female novelists tell us why they did it.

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Jewish Women and Reproductive Rights in the 21st Century

by Rabbi Balfour Brickner

Rabbi Balfour Brickner, outraged by American government policies that trammel women’s reproductive rights, tells us why these fly in the face of Jewish law and good sense.

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Miniskirts and the Messiah

by Stephanie Wellen Levine

What Hasidic girls are really like: to find out, the author lived for a year with Brooklyn’s Lubavitch Jews. Meet student "Malkie Belfer": who offers strength, spunk—and more backtalk than you’d expect.

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Half, Whole, Holy

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Tallit for a Late Bat Mitzvah

poetry by Davi Walders

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The Song at the Sea

fiction by Jennifer M. Paquette

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We Have Trespassed: Song of the Slim Girls, Starved

poetry by Susan Comninos

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Rituals

poetry by Janet Kirchheimer

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Writing Minds

by Melissa Aronczyk

What does it take to write a novel? Three first time novelists—Amy Koppleman, Dara Horn and Nina Solomon—dissect the craft.

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Reading The Diary

Where were you when you first read Anne Frank’s diary? Naomi Danis asks 23 readers—Dr. Ruth Westheimer, Dara Horn, Susan Goldman Rubin, Leslie Hollis Margulies, Rachel Kadish, Andrea King, Lara Vapnyar, Letty Cottin Pogrebin, Yona Zeldis McDonough, Joan Abelove, Beverley Naidoo, Aidan Chambers, Carolyn Mackler, Jane Gottesman, Lynne Reid Banks, Rita J. Kaplan, Nava Semel, Alice Shalvi, Ilana Kurshan, Daisy Maryles, Elka Brandt, Laura Simms—-to tell us how Anne touched their lives.

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The Dancer

by Ruth Levitt

Her husband has lost his ability to reason, but not his car keys.  What happens next?

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