In this issue: “Are You Black or Are You Jewish?” Mulling over a double birthright. Jewelry knots one family together through thievery, resentment and sorrow. Children’s book mavens tell what they’ve loved (or shrunk from) in the Bible, Helene Aylon’s visual midrash on Genesis liberates God wih a pink magic marker. Lilith’s idiosyncratic timeline poster limns 6,000 years of history.

Subscriber Exclusive
Subscriber Exclusive

My Grandmother’s Pearls

by Ellen Rosenberg Portnoy

A strand of pearls becomes a strand of memory which knots together thievery, resentment, and the sorrow of a Holocaust survivor trying to correct his past. The granddaughter finds it all out on her Junior year in Israel.

Subscriber Exclusive

The Parable of the Carpenter and His Daughter

by Jill Hammer

(OR: The Carpenter and Her Father.) A parable for the New Year and after, all about learning to separate, and discovering what happens to a daughter if you please. And if you don’t please.

The New Identity Challenge

by Sarah Blustain

The children of those black-Jewish marriages forged in the halcyon days of the 60’s Civil Rights movement have come of age. They talk here about their Jewish mothers, their pain at having to choose an identity, and the confusion they feel about a society that denies them their double birthright.

Subscriber Exclusive

Liberating God

by Ilana Stanger

Artist Helene Aylon’s visual midrash on Genesis, in which she edits misogyny, patriarchy and other "cruelty" from the text.

Subscriber Exclusive

Sugar & Spice – and Beyond

Naomi Danis

LILITH's editors asked a cross-section of our readers—authors, children's book editors, students, educators, performers—to tell us about a favorite book they'd read as a youngster, or read to a child. We especially wanted to know which books were subversive (in the best sense) and which inspired a shock of recognition, that sidelong glance at one's own reflection...

Subscriber Exclusive

Subscriber Exclusive

Subscriber Exclusive

Subscriber Exclusive