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In this issue: In prison for drug-dealing and even violent crimes, Jewish women serving long terms talk about anti-Semitism behind bars and their once-a-week Jewish women’s group. Vanguard or rear guard: what Jewish women’s volunteer organizations really do to women. The television docudrama “Holocaust” and the selling of assimilation: a feminist critique. The work of photographer Gail Rubin, murdered in Israel.

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A Jewish Women’s Community-Behind Bars

by Susan Weidman Schneider

Seven Jewish women serving long terms in a New York State jail talk about life behind bars—-particularly oppressive because of the anti-Semitism of other prisoners and guards. What helps keep them going is their once-a-week Jewish women's group.

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Volunteerism: The Great Debate

The great debate

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Gail Rubin

by Amy Stone

A photo memorial of Gail Rubin, 39 years old when terrorist bullets ended her life. With her acute appreciation of the world, she found elegance in everything she photographed.

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Our Fourmothers

poetry by Elsa Nad

Sarah, Rebekah, Leah and Rachel through the eyes of a poet.

TV’s “Holocaust”

by Aviva Cantor

The much-publicized "docu-drama" projected the subliminal message that only assimilated Jewish men, like its hero Rudi, can fight—-and survive. It is no accident that none of the Jewish women in the TV mini-series was allowed to be heroic-—or to live. A feminist critique.

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Bloodroot

fiction by Enid Levinger Powell

"You don’t look Jewish," she was told. Her grandmother had taught her that this was no compliment. 

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