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In this issue: “My Children Are Disappeared:” Jewish mothers and grandmothers courageously struggle against Argentina’s fascist murders. Feminist rabbi Elyse Goldstein reclaims mikveh; she proposes a non-Orthodox reclamation of the ritual. Pauline Bart, author of Stopping Rape, on why she thinks Jewish women are more susceptible to sexual assault.

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Take Back the Waters

by Rabbi Elyse M. Goldstein

A reform rabbi describes her own mikvah experience, and proposes a revival of interest among non-Orthodox women in this ancient Jewish women’s ritual of immersion, the traditional preface to sexual intercourse after menstruation.

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‘My Children Are Disappeared’

by Aviva Cantor

The story of Renee Epelbaum. As one of the "Madres" of Argentina, she is a key figure in the mothers’ movement to discover the fate of the 30,000 persons (about 3,000 of them Jews) abducted by the security forces during the 1976-83 reign of terror and still missing. Epelbaum tells here how her three children were seized, and of her largely unsuccessful attempts to mobilize Jewish community leaders in Argentina and the United States; some did support action on behalf of the "disappeared," while most counseled silence and accommodation as the junta tortured and murdered.

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Leaving

fiction by Toby Mostysser

What happens to her mother when the grown-up daughter of a Holocaust survivor tries to lead her life as an independent adult woman.

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My Father’s Death

poetry by Marcia Falk

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Jewish Divorce

poetry by Barbara Bialick

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Domestic Dinner

poetry by Karen Alkalay-Gut

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The Holocaust Revision – I

poetry by Katherine Janowitz

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The Holocaust Revision – II

poetry by Katherine Janowitz

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A Jew Walks

poetry by Henny Wenkart

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A Reconstruction

poetry by Florence Weinberger

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