Tag : women

The Lilith Blog

October 12, 2020 by

The Struggle of Finding Shelter as an Orthodox Woman

Sukkot is supposed to be the holiday of rejoicing.

And yet for me, a particularly difficult time, as a single woman.

Usually, it’s the week before Sukkot that I put a call out to ask the internet to help me build a sukkah or find one – and then, sometime during the actual week of the holiday I spill my guts and explain why the week brings about so much heartbreak.

I even wrote a poem about it once

(more…)

Continue Reading

  • No Comments
  •  

July 27, 2020 by

Working from Home

In interviews with more than a dozen women who work as lawyers, writers, architects, teachers, nurses and nonprofit administrators, many said that they were grateful to have some child care help pre-quarantine, and that they could work from home. But they have been slightly stunned to learn that they are expected to organize and manage every domestic need for their family, while maintaining a full-time professional career as part of a dual-career couple.

JENNIFER MEDINA and LISA LERER, “When Mom’s Zoom Meeting Is the One That Has to Wait,” The New York Times, April 24, 2020.

Continue Reading

  • No Comments
  •  

July 27, 2020 by

First Woman Chancellor At JTS!

Shuly Rubin Schwartz, a groundbreaking scholar of American Jewish history, has just become the first woman to serve as chancellor of The Jewish Theological Seminary in its 134-year history. JTS is the flagship institution of Conservative Judaism. Chancellor Schwartz, who earned her Ph.D. at JTS, became one of the first women on its faculty and was instrumental in the addition of Jewish gender studies to the curriculum; her writing has brought to light previously overlooked contributions of women to the development of American Judaism.

Continue Reading

  • No Comments
  •  

April 20, 2020 by

Prayer, Your Way •

The Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance’s goal is to expand spiritual, ritual, intellectual and political opportunities for women within the framework of a Modern Orthodox interpretation of Jewish law. Their resources can help you discover where women can say kaddish, join women’s prayer groups, find “partnership” minyanim (for women and men) and hear women read from the megillah on Purim.

jofa.org/prayer-compass

Continue Reading

  • No Comments
  •  

April 20, 2020 by

Women Make History •

“Well-behaved women seldom make history,” contended historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich in 1976, and feminist discourse enthusiastically adopted this statement. From its beginnings, feminism sought to liberate itself from silence and compliance and eplace this with speech and protest. A new exhibition in Israel, “Women Make History: Feminism in the Age of Transnationalism,” centers on this question: In the wake of a lengthy feminist struggle, has a revolution in traditional gender roles indeed occurred in the political space? Can women today make alternative history and, in the future, lead a true revolution? The exhibition seeks to present the ways women artists to confront gender-based power arrangements. At the Haifa Museum of Art.

hma.org.il/eng/Exhibitions

Continue Reading

  • No Comments
  •  

The Lilith Blog

February 19, 2020 by

Becoming an Abortion Doula

Earlier this year, Lilith asked me what my pro-choice New Year’s resolution was for 2020.

Without hesitating, I knew what my answer would be: I would become an abortion doula, who guides folks through the procedure. It is a very straightforward and simple goal on the surface, especially since I had already sent in my application to become a trained doula with the DC Doulas for Choice Collective (DCDC).

But there’s a lot of meaning to this choice. I’ve wanted to be an abortion doula for years, since I learned what it meant. Like a birth doula, an abortion doula is someone who is dedicated to guiding the patient through the abortion procedure. This can include answering their questions, remaining with them during the procedure even if they are under anesthesia, and remaining with them in the recovery room. It can mean acting as an advocate, getting water or snacks, praying with the patient, or just chatting about the Bachelor. Being a doula can take a lot of forms, but my primary goal is to support the patient with whatever they may need at any given moment.

Why go this extra mile in support of patients? Because I’m not only pro-choice, but I am pro-abortion and pro-access. That means going beyond supporting someone’s right to choose to terminate a pregnancy but fighting to remove the barriers that may prevent them from doing so.

I do not believe that abortion is a necessary evil, but a moral and social good. It’s what has led me to become not only a doula but a volunteer in other ways as well. I am a clinic escort with the Washington Area Clinic Defense Task Force (WACDTF) and I walk patients to and from their vehicles among anti-choice protestors who can be loud, in the way, and occasionally violent. I am also a volunteer with the DMV Practical Abortion Support Network, DAPSN, an organization that provides rides or walks to and from a patient’s hotel and the clinic and housing, all for free.

Washington, D.C. is one of the few areas in the country where someone can get an abortion throughout pregnancy, so there are hundreds of folks who travel from often very far states to access care here. Many of those folks rely on abortion funds to pay for their travels and expenses but can’t afford to bring someone with them. That’s where DAPSN and DCDC come in. Our job is to be the stand in for folks who cannot be with the patient.

This work is very different than fighting a political campaign. I am a proud volunteer with NARAL Pro-Choice America where I sit on their all-volunteer Action Council. I show up to protest whenever I can. I have even spoken out at the Supreme Court and been arrested for civil disobedience over abortion. But this year, I want to focus on the patients who make the choice to obtain abortion care. Often, lost in the noise of the political struggle to keep abortion safe and legal are the patients themselves who have to navigate complicated TRAP laws, legalese, and financial barriers to receiving care but who are human beings and moral agents like the rest of us, and who deserve a friendly face and sympathetic ear during their medical procedure.

It is easy to forget that the fight for abortion means fighting for real people, with jobs and families and social lives. They have names and faces, beyond a statistic. These are the people I am committing to supporting and getting to know.

Since my resolution was published, I successfully made it through the interviews and will begin my training in March. This year, I will not only fight for the right to abortion access, but hopefully sit with people and be their support as they exercise that right.

Continue Reading

  • 1 Comment
  •  

November 5, 2019 by

Speaking While Female •

Historically, women have been nearly absent from the record of public speaking, with their speeches seldom respected or remembered. In an effort to change that, a new initiative showcases women speakers from antiquity to the present, and around the world. Ida B. Wells on lynching. Rose Schneiderman on the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire. Alexandra Kollontai on revolution. Oprah at the Golden Globes. They’re all here, and hundreds more, with transcripts, video, and, in some cases, audio. Are there historically significant speeches by women you’d like them to include? Send suggestions to: info@speakingwhilefemale.co

Continue Reading

  • No Comments
  •  

November 5, 2019 by

Reclaiming Women’s Yiddish Writing •

In poems, essays, plays, novels, and every other genre known to literature, women wrote in Yiddish about love, family, politics, economics, class, sexuality, and the lure and dangers of the modern world. Perhaps the most surprising thing about this writing is how little of it is known today. In a downloadable lecture series, Professor Anita Norich of the University of Michigan examines Yiddish poetry and prose written by women, and discusses how these women claimed a place for themselves as modern Jewish writers. The four lectures by Norich, who is translator of the forthcoming Fun Lublin biz Nyu York, by Kadya Molodovsky, include more than five hours of video. Available from Yiddish Book Center

Continue Reading

  • No Comments
  •