Tag : jewish feminism

The Lilith Blog

September 14, 2020 by

Lilith Votes: How I’m Feeling (Spoiler: Not Great!) as a First-Time Feminist Voter

August 18th marked the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which gave some women–white women–the hard-won right to vote in the United States, and I feel disappointed.

As a first-time voter, radical feminist, and survivor of sexual assault, I’d anticipated that this election would be more hopeful than it is. In 2016 I felt the possibility that women would have a more significant say in government and that our voices would be heard. Hillary Clinton was predicted to win the election, which would have been an historic validation. But Donald Trump became president, and the past four years have been even worse than anticipated. From the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh to the defunding of Planned Parenthood, women’s voices and bodies are being left in the dust.

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The Lilith Blog

September 9, 2020 by

My Hair as a Metaphor

I lived trying to fit in. It was much more than “curly hair wasn’t in style back then.” It was: “You can’t exist.” It was: “Do not exist.” It was expressed as: “What’s wrong with your hair?” with the questioner trying not to laugh when asking.  

My hair was a problem to be solved. From inside and outside the walls of my house, my hair was a symbol of something larger that had nothing and everything to do with me.

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The Lilith Blog

September 8, 2020 by

It’s the First Day of School. Institutions Are Failing Our Kids.

Parents of young children are masters at winging it. Scary movie? Apply some magical thinking and it qualifies as a comedy. Laundry to fold? Transform the chore into a game show. Healthy dinner? Add broccoli to boxed mac and cheese.

But few of us have had to wing it on such a huge scale. On a Sunday evening in mid-March, New York City public school families learned that school was to shut down beginning the next day, Monday, March 16. Like so many, my children went to school on a Friday and at the end of the day gathered a few belongings, bid goodbye to the teachers they loved and never set foot in their classrooms again.

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The Lilith Blog

September 2, 2020 by

“For Me, Art Has Always Been a Protest”

IMG_0140The block-long mural is called the Wall of Justice and it began to take shape on Brooklyn’s Fourth Avenue in Gowanus within days of the police shooting of George Floyd. (more…)

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The Lilith Blog

September 1, 2020 by

Black Jewish Women Artists You Should Know… Jordana Daumec

Art–whether it be dancing, painting, drawing, film–creates a space for self-examination, helping us to envision possible futures, and better versions of ourselves. And the Jewish month of Elul is traditionally an opportunity for introspection before the High Holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.

Recognizing the power of art to be transformative, Lilith is highlighting Black Jewish women artists in this time leading up to and through Elul. On Lilith’s platforms you’ll have a chance to experience, share, and celebrate their work.

You can also participate by letting us know (at info@Lilith.org) Black Jewish women creators we should include!

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This week Lilith is featuring Jordana Daumec.

Website: https://national.ballet.ca/Meet/Dancers/1st-Soloists/Jordana-Daumec

Jordana Daumec was born in New York City. She trained at Studio Maestro in New York City and Canada’s National Ballet School. Jordana joined The National Ballet of Canada as an RBC Apprentice in 2003 and was promoted to First Soloist in 2015.

What is the comfort food you’re making during the pandemic?

This is an easy answer, challah! I make my husband and me a loaf every week. Such a great way to spend a day. I love the smell of the baking bread, you can see the love that you put into it and it comes out so delicious. I’m sure we’d eat more than one loaf a week if I made us more.  

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What is the world calling you to be/do in this moment?

Tackling issues of diversity have always been a calling to me but in this time of the pandemic, when we are all home and have more free time, my focus has been on what I can do for my dance community in a positive and constructive way. Starting conversations, bringing awareness, listening, being active to help make change. It’s really wonderful to see so many people coming together to use this time to make a difference. 

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For what in your life do you feel most grateful?

This is a hard one to limit to just one thing. I’m grateful for the love and support of my husband and family on a daily basis. With their constant love, I feel like I can accomplish anything. I am also grateful that I am in a profession that I love to do. I get to work with amazing people who have had such an impact on me. An example was getting to work with William Forsythe and Crystal Pite this year. It was career changing! Honestly, I can say I feel the Mazels coming down from the stars. 

 

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The Lilith Blog

August 26, 2020 by

Friendships and Race: A New Orleans Coming of Age Story

New Orleans, in all its tawdry glory, is the setting for Iris Martin Cohen’s second novel, Last Call on Decatur Street (Park Row Books, $27.99).  After swearing that she’ll never get to return to the Big Easy, Rosemary gets kicked out of college and finds herself back in her hometown, working as a burlesque dancer. Most nights she dulls her private sorrow with a combination of booze, drugs and sex but on the January night in question, her world is cracked wide open and she’s forced to confront the choices—good and bad—that she’s made.  Cohen talks to Fiction Editor Yona Zeldis McDonough about how her Jewish protagonist fits into this very Catholic world. 

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The Lilith Blog

August 24, 2020 by

A Muslim Protagonist’s Angst: Jews Will Relate

Ramy is a show about faith, Millennials, New Jersey, friendship, and porn.  It’s a show about searching for purpose, identity, and community even as your identity is assigned to you by outsiders, your community may not be a fit for you, and your purpose is constrained by navigating between those two extremes. 

It’s hard to be Muslim-American. It got harder on September 11, 2001, the show reminds us, but it was never easy.  It’s hard to be a Millenial who cares about faith but who also cares about being in your 20s, and Having Experiences.

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The Lilith Blog

August 13, 2020 by

Daphne Merkin on the Nature of Love and Lust

Daphne Merkin is an essayist known for her take—at once both ferociously observant and fiercely introspective—on everything from depression, spanking during sex and the importance of handbags.  In 22 Minutes of Unconditional Love (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $26)) her first novel in more than 30 years, Merkin turns her gimlet-eyed attention to Judith Stone, a young book editor in New York City who has not yet had her first real reckoning with love—or with the erotic charge that often fuels it. 

Enter Howard Rose, the somewhat older attorney she meets at a party.  Howard arouses her in ways she’s never before experienced and very quickly, she’s putty in his hands.  That he’s inclined to insult, undermine and emotionally abuse her only makes him more desirable.  Merkin talks to Fiction Editor Yona Zeldis McDonough about the nature of lust, love and whether the two can ever truly be reconciled. 

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The Lilith Blog

August 13, 2020 by

A History Professor and her Homeschool Co-Op

Four months ago, history professor Karen Miller thought she’d be spending her sabbatical living and working in Manila as a Fulbright scholar. That, of course, was before the coronavirus became an international pandemic and upended her plans, forcing her to make several major decisions, including whether to leave the Philippines and return to her home in Brooklyn, New York.

Miller ultimately did return—on March 14th. Since then, she and a group of friends have created Homeschoolcoop2020.com, a free, online educational program for children and their caretakers. As of mid-August, the Coop has offered hundreds of diverse classes, some of them single sessions and others ongoing. To date, the range has included yoga, basic sewing, beginning Latin for high school students, intro to chess, human sexuality for middle schoolers, the history of the Panama Canal, drawing, French, and poetry—both writing and appreciating.

Miller recently spoke to Lilith’s Eleanor J. Bader about the Coop’s formation and exponential growth.  

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The Lilith Blog

August 11, 2020 by

Black Jewish Women Artists You Should Know…Jessica Valoris

Art–whether it be dancing, painting, drawing, film–creates a space for self-examination, helping us to envision possible futures, and better versions of ourselves. And the Jewish month of Elul is traditionally an opportunity for introspection before the High Holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.

Recognizing the power of art to be transformative, Lilith is highlighting Black Jewish women artists in this time leading up to and through Elul. On Lilith’s platforms you’ll have a chance to experience, share, buy and celebrate their work.

You can also participate by letting us know (at info@Lilith.org) Black Jewish women creators we should include!

2 (1)Jessica Valoris is a multidisciplinary installation artist who weaves together sound, collage, painting, sculpture, and facilitated ritual to build installations and experiences that have been described as sacred, intentional, and activated. She’s inspired by Afrofuturism, metaphysics, and historical memory.

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