Tag : harassment

January 10, 2019 by

Harassed at Work? At School? At Synagogue? •

Jewish institutions and all who work, learn or worship in them can shape cultures of safety, respect and fairness. This is the mission of B’Kavod (“with respect,” in Hebrew), a new project offering training and policy development as well as report- ing and helpline services. Their three-month program “Building Safe Respectful Jewish Organizations” helps schools, synagogues, and organizations prevent sexual harass- ment by donors, bosses, teachers, or co-workers. They provide a Facebook group and webinars on preventing donor harassment, a #MeToo location for rabbis, articles about harassment in fundraising and at Jewish organizations, a self-assessment tool, and guidelines for reporting incidents. A guide to “Going Public with Your Experi- ence of Harassment” will be useful in both Jewish and general settings. The Good People Fund and the Jewish Women’s Foundation of New York have partnered in funding this project. BeKavod.org

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The Lilith Blog

September 5, 2018 by

Rosh Hashanah Forgiveness for #MeToo Offenders? Not Yet.

MicWill no one think of the poor abusers in the #metoo moment?  Don’t they get a shot at redemption?

The question sounds like a joke, or maybe a gross parody at first. We’re nowhere near the point of spending enough time supporting and thinking about the victims survivors to feel anything close to an obligation to help their abusers. Not. Even. Close.  But right now, that damn question (phrased in almost exactly this way — I’m not kidding!) is everywhere. As the summer ended, Louis C.K. quietly showcased a new set at the Comedy Cellar, his first since he admitted, and sort-of-apologized , for forcing aspiring female comics to watch him masturbate, the question of redemption is everywhere. 

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The Lilith Blog

August 22, 2018 by

When a Queer Feminist Professor is Accused of Harassment

canada-ontario-toronto-front-campusWe defend our friends. It’s natural. It’s powerful. It’s what friendship is all about. Certainly Avital Ronell’s friends— the most powerful philosophers in academe, for what it’s worth—wanted to defend her from the recently revealed allegations that she’d sexually harassed one of her male graduate students. The Title IX complaint by Nimrod Reitman  resulted in her year-long suspension from NYU.

But she had high-profile defenders in the feminist world. Judith Butler. Slavoj Žižek. Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak. Shoshana Felman. These are just a few of the famous progressive scholars who lept to her defense in a widely circulated letter excerpted in the New York Times. Presumably without all the facts, they chose to attack the survivor. That’s certainly not a surprise, human behavior being what it is.

But to be honest, as an academic, I expected more. From the most revered names in the humanities, people who would be expected to make conclusions based on evidence in the name of social justice, I expected more. 

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The Lilith Blog

January 29, 2015 by

How Safe Does She Feel Walking Down the Street?

Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 1.54.46 PMWhen 24-year-old aspiring actor Shoshana Roberts saw an ad soliciting “Female Talent for Anti Street Harassment Viral Video” on Craigslist, she immediately knew that she wanted to apply.

The date was September 12, 2014.

A brief telephone interview with Chicago filmmaker Rob Bliss of Rob Bliss Creative took place a day later, and by the end of October Bliss had captured 10 hours of footage showing Roberts walking through the five boroughs of New York City while being catcalled by dozens of men. He later edited this into a two-minute video that has now been seen by approximately 39 million people in every corner of the world.

The video was a collaboration between Bliss and Hollaback, an international, feminist, anti-street-harassment organization which, since its founding in 2011, has trained activists in 26 countries and more than 80 U.S. cities to oppose anti-woman violence and misogyny. Although Roberts wasn’t familiar with Hollaback when she answered the ad, the issues the group works on resonate deeply for her.

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