by Alisha Kaplan

Under-the-Neath

A young woman becomes her grandmother’s teacher. Though the old woman, now near 90, has lived in Canada for over 60 years, she still speaks with a heavy Hungarian accent and an inverted arrangement of words in which her granddaughter delights. “What for do I need that?” Grandma will ask about a new skirt. “I can make it myself.” “Under-the-neath” she will say where the napkin has gone. When her granddaughter calls to say she’s on her way for their Tuesday night dinner, “Lovely!” Grandma replies. She often uses the word, and, coming from her wrinkled throat, it always sounds lovely.

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