levitra discount levitra and alchol prescription levitra adderall and cialis levitra medication price of levitra 20 mg

Keren Blankfeld

After Auschwitz, They Never Forgot Each Other

The reunion lasted about two hours. He finally had to ask: Did she have something to do with the fact that he’d managed to survive in Auschwitz all that time?

She held up her hand to display five fingers. Her voice was loud, her Slovakian accent deep. “I saved you five times from bad shipment,” she said.

“I knew she would do that,” said Mr. Wisnia to his grandchildren. “It’s absolutely amazing. Amazing.”

There was more. “I was waiting for you,” Ms. Tichauer said. Mr. Wisnia was astonished. After she escaped the death march, she had waited for him in Warsaw. She’d followed the plan. But he never came.

She had loved him, she told him quietly. He had loved her, too, he said.

KEREN BLANKFELD, “Lovers in Auschwitz, Reunited 72 Years Later. He Had One Question,” New York Times, December 8, 2019